Tag Archives: blog

Setting up a Class Blog

This Wednesday, April 7th, Lorna Costantini will host a session in Elluminate/LearnCentral at 7pm EST. The topic for this session will be setting up a class blog. We will use the education version of Weebly (http://education.weebly.com) to show participants how to use the features and settings for a class blog. Demonstrations of the teacher’s dashboard, student accounts, user permissions as well as the basics of blogging will be featured in the session. Additionally, the importance of commenting on blogs and examples of class blogs will be shared during this session.

If you already have a class blog, please share this session with your colleagues. If not, we hope to see you Wednesday! To access our session in Elluminate please one of the following links:

Full link: http: https://sas.elluminate.com/d.jnlp?sid=lcevents&password=Webinar_Guest
Short link: http://tinyurl.com/lcparticipant

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My Twitter Followers are Gone?

As I was ‘plurking‘ this afternoon, I soon discovered that several people were missing many of their Twitter followers. For many of us, tweeting and plurking is serious business and crucial to professional development. Through the tweets and plurks, I learn a great deal about new technology tools, if someone is streaming a workshop or session live, advice on tech strategies and tools, as well as where and what people are eating for dinner. Granted, the posts about eating dinner or going to bed are not posts that help me grow professionally but the two micro blog tools are my lifeline to what is currently happening in the ed tech world. It is live, up close, and personal with notices of all kinds of learning opportunities available for free presented from all parts of the world.
This evening I noticed on my Twitter profile page that the problem of followers ‘disappearing’ from our lists was ‘almost finished’. I took a screenshot as I found the notice interesting but I don’t have complete confidence in the efficiency of restoring the missing followers.

I haven’t found an application that has the same features of Skitch where you can highlight and draw on screenshots so I only have a plain screenshot here with a poorly handdrawn circle around the statement of ‘almost all’. The statement doesn’t cause me to have much confidence in the restoration process.

Just for kicks since I wasn’t receiving all of my Tweets, I checked out Twitter’s blog and they had a post about the problem of the missing followers. Their explanation of the process is shown below:

Where Are My Followers?

Update: This has been fixed but the actual numbers and profile pictures might not look right until tomorrow afternoon due to caching.

Recently, some people began noticing a decline in their following and follower numbers. We investigated and determined this was caused by an error during a database upgrade. We’ll be restoring followers throughout the day to those who were affected and keeping the status blog and Get Satisfaction forum updated with specifics.

So by tomorrow afternoon Twitter profiles ‘might‘ not look right due to a caching difficulty. Okay, but will all of my followers and their tweets show up en masse? I don’t think anyone really knows.
To show how important tweets are to us, a fellow edublogger Tom Barrett posted a picture to his Flickr account showing the breakdown of his Professional Learning Network (PLN). The picture was included in his post about missing his Twitter Connections and posted to Flickr. I found it extremely interesting as if I were graph my connections to learning from other ed tech colleagues the dispersion of resources would be very similar.

Notice the amount of the graph attributed to Twitter. I definitely concur that Twitter is a crucial piece of learning in my PLN. If you graphed your PLN resources how much would be allocated for learning from Twitter or Plurk? Stop and think about it – it just may surprise you the depth and volume of learning that occurs from micro blogging. So please continue to Tweet and Plurk and continue to make those networking connections.

Can We Talk?

No, I am not impersonating Joan Rivers but I do want to reflect upon the importance of developing a conversation in a blog. As shared in Vicki Davis‘ blog, “The Cool Cat Teacher Blog“, the development of a two way conversation is key to building a successful blog. In the post, “How to Comment Like a King or Queen”:

“Commenting has truly been the fuel that has fired readership for my blog and opportunity for me. It is also part of being a responsible blogger in general. If one is an expert, I guess they may just want to keep their “wisdom” on their own blog, but the true conversation participants are those who contribute to the discussion wherever the blog posting is.”

She continues to discuss appropriate ways to leave a comment on someone’s blog. Make it meaningful and relevant to the posting and let the blog’s author know that you get them, understand and can relate to whatever the author was sharing. A dialogue or conversation with spark up and give each author additional content to read, reflect and write. Create relationships with ‘neighbors’, blog authors that write about postings on your blog, and become part of the bigger picture – making a difference in the life of a reader or yourself via a post your wrote or an especially moving comment left on your blog that significantly impacts you. Leaving comments does not need to be a daunting task when responding to a post on the ‘superedubloggers’ blog. Meaningful comments are always welcome, appreciated and necessary to spark the educational discourse that we are seeking to change and make a difference, leaving our imprint upon the world, one blog at a time.

I’m Starting to Get this Blogging Stuff

This is my second attempt at a personal/professional blog and think I am finally coming into my own and understanding what makes a successful blogger. By no means do I think that I am in the same ‘weight class’ as the uber bloggers, but the fact that I have readers subscribed and hits on my blog’s clustermap is a huge accomplishment for me. Although there are many factors that make a blog a success, one of those factors is reading other blogs and posting reflections about what you have read.

In the eArticle written by Dean Shareski entitled, “Student and Teacher Blogs that Succeed“, the paragraph illustrates this point beautifully.

Blogging is mostly about reading
Blogging is way more about reading than it is writing. Many teachers don’t see this at first. Most classrooms provide a good balance of traditional reading and writing opportunities. Teachers recognize that in order to be a good writer you have to read good writing. Yet when it comes to blogging, most want to write immediately and sit back and wait for the world to pay attention. It won’t happen. Provide as much time for your students to read blogs as write. If you decide you want to blog or have your students blog, don’t feel badly about spending a few weeks or even months reading blogs. Look for exemplary work. Look for blogs that you relate to. Find blogs that have a different perspective on things you’re interested in Talk with your students about the blogs they enjoy. Before you write a post, be sure you are responding to something you’ve seen, read or heard.

I can definitely testify that following this suggestion will prove to you and your readers the truth of those sentiments. The more blogs I read, I am able to see how successful blogs are structured, created, and promoted. I can ask questions or clarification of points presented in blogs by the ‘superbloggers’ and have been willing to leave an encouraging comment in return. As exciting as it is to see the red dots grow on my blog’s cluster map, utilizing tools of this type that are purposeful and aesthetically pleasing can be gleaned from other bloggers. What I have discovered is that most bloggers don’t post their reflections, thoughts and viewpoints for fame or notoriety. Most bloggers share their reflections in an effort to explore and refine the craft of teaching through the reflection process. As educators sharing best practices and thoughts about classroom strategies that work or don’t work true enlightenment occurs in a way that is not possible without taking a moment to reflect upon our teaching practices. Without reading literature, periodicals or blogs, professional growth will stagnate – just as the progress or success of your blog without posting your reflections of your lessons, activities or readings of literature or periodicals.

I’m Starting to Get this Blogging Stuff

This is my second attempt at a personal/professional blog and think I am finally coming into my own and understanding what makes a successful blogger. By no means do I think that I am in the same ‘weight class’ as the uber bloggers, but the fact that I have readers subscribed and hits on my blog’s clustermap is a huge accomplishment for me. Although there are many factors that make a blog a success, one of those factors is reading other blogs and posting reflections about what you have read.

In the eArticle written by Dean Shareski entitled, “Student and Teacher Blogs that Succeed“, the paragraph illustrates this point beautifully.

Blogging is mostly about reading

Blogging is way more about reading than it is writing. Many teachers don’t see this at first. Most classrooms provide a good balance of traditional reading and writing opportunities. Teachers recognize that in order to be a good writer you have to read good writing. Yet when it comes to blogging, most want to write immediately and sit back and wait for the world to pay attention. It won’t happen. Provide as much time for your students to read blogs as write. If you decide you want to blog or have your students blog, don’t feel badly about spending a few weeks or even months reading blogs. Look for exemplary work. Look for blogs that you relate to. Find blogs that have a different perspective on things you’re interested in Talk with your students about the blogs they enjoy. Before you write a post, be sure you are responding to something you’ve seen, read or heard.

I can definitely testify that following this suggestion will prove to you and your readers the truth of those sentiments. The more blogs I read, I am able to see how successful blogs are structured, created, and promoted. I can ask questions or clarification of points presented in blogs by the ‘superbloggers’ and have been willing to leave an encouraging comment in return. As exciting as it is to see the red dots grow on my blog’s cluster map, utilizing tools of this type that are purposeful and aesthetically pleasing can be gleaned from other bloggers.

What I have discovered is that most bloggers don’t post their reflections, thoughts and viewpoints for fame or notoriety. Most bloggers share their reflections in an effort to explore and refine the craft of teaching through the reflection process. As educators sharing best practices and thoughts about classroom strategies that work or don’t work true enlightenment occurs in a way that is not possible without taking a moment to reflect upon our teaching practices. Without reading literature, periodicals or blogs, professional growth will stagnate – just as the progress or success of your blog without posting your reflections of your lessons, activities or readings of literature or periodicals.