Monthly Archives: September 2008

Four **FREE** Must See Sites that Won't Want to Miss – Part # 3

As I stated in the previous two parts of this four part series on instructional technology tools that can be used in the classroom to enrich learning, I actively participate in a personal professional learning network using Plurk and Twitter. Through these two web services I have learned copious amounts of information, training and resources in the past six or seven months than I have in just about all 19 years of teaching. It is amazing and I wanted to share some of the tools that I deem extremely useful to enrich learning in the classroom.

Source: Dabbleboard.com

The third tool I want to share is Dabbleboard. I have written about this unique tool before but I wanted to share it again with you. At first glance, Dabbleboard looks like a limited version of Inspiration or CMAP. While that may be partially true, the biggest asset of Dabbleboard is the ability to collaborate and share a diagram with a team of students. Students can be at different computers, different locations, and work on the diagram at different times. Dabbleboard diagrams are shared by the use of an invite via email and now a URL generated by the site. Several enhancements were made with the most recent release.

Within the Dabbleboard layout, any previous diagrams created are stored in the library and can be reused and imported into new diagrams. When I logged into Dabbleboard, the diagram that I originally created back in July was automatically loaded for me. I can continue with that or begin a new diagram.

Dabbleboard is an excellent way to brainstorm story maps for digital storytelling, generate a hypothesis to test as part of the scientific process or create a flowchart depicting a process or steps of a group project. You can create a template for students to access with the capability of adding weblinks, images, and sharing with others in real time. New features have recently been added such as rotating or flipping images and auto detection of shapes drawn by hand to create resizable, neatly drawn objects.

Source: Dabbleboard.com

I really like that you can share diagrams via a URL instead of limited to an email from Dabbleboard. If I were having students create accounts, I would have specified usernames and use my email address for the registration process as displayed to the left. I could also set up a generic email address and add the individual student’s names to the main email address.This way I would still have access control to the students’ accounts. Diagrams can be made public or private allowing only designated students access to collaborate on a diagram. This is a great security feature when working with students.

Source: Dabbleboard.com

To the right is the original diagram I created in July. If you click on the thumbnail image, it will take you to the public link of the diagram. Take a few moments and experiment with the diagram and move items, change colors, etc. to see the full capabilities of Dabbleboard. Dabble with Dabbleboard!

Four **FREE** Must See Sites that Won’t Want to Miss – Part # 3

As I stated in the previous two parts of this four part series on instructional technology tools that can be used in the classroom to enrich learning, I actively participate in a personal professional learning network using Plurk and Twitter. Through these two web services I have learned copious amounts of information, training and resources in the past six or seven months than I have in just about all 19 years of teaching. It is amazing and I wanted to share some of the tools that I deem extremely useful to enrich learning in the classroom.

Source: Dabbleboard.com

The third tool I want to share is Dabbleboard. I have written about this unique tool before but I wanted to share it again with you. At first glance, Dabbleboard looks like a limited version of Inspiration or CMAP. While that may be partially true, the biggest asset of Dabbleboard is the ability to collaborate and share a diagram with a team of students. Students can be at different computers, different locations, and work on the diagram at different times. Dabbleboard diagrams are shared by the use of an invite via email and now a URL generated by the site. Several enhancements were made with the most recent release.

Within the Dabbleboard layout, any previous diagrams created are stored in the library and can be reused and imported into new diagrams. When I logged into Dabbleboard, the diagram that I originally created back in July was automatically loaded for me. I can continue with that or begin a new diagram.

Dabbleboard is an excellent way to brainstorm story maps for digital storytelling, generate a hypothesis to test as part of the scientific process or create a flowchart depicting a process or steps of a group project. You can create a template for students to access with the capability of adding weblinks, images, and sharing with others in real time. New features have recently been added such as rotating or flipping images and auto detection of shapes drawn by hand to create resizable, neatly drawn objects.

Source: Dabbleboard.com

I really like that you can share diagrams via a URL instead of limited to an email from Dabbleboard. If I were having students create accounts, I would have specified usernames and use my email address for the registration process as displayed to the left. I could also set up a generic email address and add the individual student’s names to the main email address.This way I would still have access control to the students’ accounts. Diagrams can be made public or private allowing only designated students access to collaborate on a diagram. This is a great security feature when working with students.

Source: Dabbleboard.com

To the right is the original diagram I created in July. If you click on the thumbnail image, it will take you to the public link of the diagram. Take a few moments and experiment with the diagram and move items, change colors, etc. to see the full capabilities of Dabbleboard. Dabble with Dabbleboard!

Four **FREE** Must See Sites that Won't Want to Miss – Part # 2

Flowgram.com

Source: Flowgram.com

As stated previously, I am addicted to microblogging and have learned about fabulous resources that can be used in the classroom to enrich learning. In part 1 of this series, ‘Four **FREE** Must See Resources You Won’t Want to Miss’, I discussed using Glogster.com. The second resource I would like to share with you is Flowgram.

According to the Flowgram website,

About Flowgram

We are building a new communications platform that lets anyone package and share anything on the internet in ways never before possible.

A flowgram combines the advantages of slide presentations and screencasts with an interactive user experience that fully exploits the fact that almost all the information we might ever need is already on the web.

Using the zero download Flowgram Maker, creators can assemble and annotate web pages, photographs, videos etc on any topic, and add a voice narrative which provides context, emotion and consistency. This uniquely personalized package can be shared as an embeddable widget, email or as a link to either a private group or with the world. Flowgram recipients can interact with any of its pages by, for example, clicking on links, and playing and pausing videos.

Some of the great Flowgrams I discovered at the Flowgram site are listed below:

50 Way to Tell a Story

Keeping Kids Safe on the Internet

Techcruch50 2008 Winners

50 Great Widgets to Add to your Blog

If you are familiar with the Adobe Presenter, plug in to PowerPoint formerly known as generating Breeze presentations, then you will have no trouble creating Flowgrams. Although that experience is beneficial, it is not necessary to create successful Flowgrams with audio. You will need an external mic to record the narration for each slide and a slideshow presentation in mind. The site has resources on how to create flowgrams and it walks you through the different process step by step.

When the flowgram is complete you can share it via email, embeding in a wiki, blog, or webpage. Flowgrams can be uploaded very easily to MySpace, Facebook and Youtube. You can read the background of how Flowgram got started, the things recently added to improve flowgrams and learn tips and tricks for creating exciting flowgrams.

I can definitely see great potential for creating and saving flowgrams for use in a variety of content areas and grade levels. Flowgrams could be used with a teacher is out and still provide quality instruction while the class is with a substitute teacher. As with Glogster.com, using Flowgrams the possibilities are endless. So go with the ‘flow’ and head over to Flowgram.com!

Four **FREE** Must See Sites that Won’t Want to Miss – Part # 2

Flowgram.com

Source: Flowgram.com

As stated previously, I am addicted to microblogging and have learned about fabulous resources that can be used in the classroom to enrich learning. In part 1 of this series, ‘Four **FREE** Must See Resources You Won’t Want to Miss’, I discussed using Glogster.com. The second resource I would like to share with you is Flowgram.

According to the Flowgram website,

About Flowgram

We are building a new communications platform that lets anyone package and share anything on the internet in ways never before possible.

A flowgram combines the advantages of slide presentations and screencasts with an interactive user experience that fully exploits the fact that almost all the information we might ever need is already on the web.

Using the zero download Flowgram Maker, creators can assemble and annotate web pages, photographs, videos etc on any topic, and add a voice narrative which provides context, emotion and consistency. This uniquely personalized package can be shared as an embeddable widget, email or as a link to either a private group or with the world. Flowgram recipients can interact with any of its pages by, for example, clicking on links, and playing and pausing videos.

Some of the great Flowgrams I discovered at the Flowgram site are listed below:

50 Way to Tell a Story

Keeping Kids Safe on the Internet

Techcruch50 2008 Winners

50 Great Widgets to Add to your Blog

If you are familiar with the Adobe Presenter, plug in to PowerPoint formerly known as generating Breeze presentations, then you will have no trouble creating Flowgrams. Although that experience is beneficial, it is not necessary to create successful Flowgrams with audio. You will need an external mic to record the narration for each slide and a slideshow presentation in mind. The site has resources on how to create flowgrams and it walks you through the different process step by step.

When the flowgram is complete you can share it via email, embeding in a wiki, blog, or webpage. Flowgrams can be uploaded very easily to MySpace, Facebook and Youtube. You can read the background of how Flowgram got started, the things recently added to improve flowgrams and learn tips and tricks for creating exciting flowgrams.

I can definitely see great potential for creating and saving flowgrams for use in a variety of content areas and grade levels. Flowgrams could be used with a teacher is out and still provide quality instruction while the class is with a substitute teacher. As with Glogster.com, using Flowgrams the possibilities are endless. So go with the ‘flow’ and head over to Flowgram.com!

Four **FREE** Must See Resources You Won't Want to Miss

Hello, my name is Kim and I am addicted to microblogging. Whether it be Twitter or Plurk it doesn’t matter as long as I am reading, collaborating, sharing, conversing, etc. An awesome mentor, friend and colleague, Peggy George, introduced me to Tweetdeck to view and follow tweets on Twitter. As a result of those tweets or plurks, I discovered some fantastic resources that I have to share with you. You may be familiar with some of the ones I will share, especially if we follow one another on Plurk or Twitter. I am going to do a four part series on these new resources that you won’t want to miss so be sure to stay tuned for all four postings. These four resources are not the end all to be all sites but they are new to many in the microbloggingsphere and have really been Anyway, on with the show!

Source: Glogster

The first site is Glogster. At Glogster you can upload pictures, add graphics and text to the pictures and create graphics to dress up blogs, wikis, websites or your avatars for various sites. You can be as creative as your imagination is capable of and the possibilities of designing graphics at this site is endless. The site is user friendly and phenomenal for creating exciting collages for homepages of wikis, blogs, websites or class projects.

I was looking through the ones that were shared at the site and there are some amazing creations to explore for ideas and motivation. Be cautious though and steer younger students away from the gallery if using with students as some of the creations are of adult content; not necessarily obscene or vulgar just of adult topics like rape or diseases. I saw one class creation of butterflies and a student example using the graphics at the site for a diagram similar to those created in Inspiration but more colorful.

Pagesage

Source: Pagesage

This Glogster is of a two groups of students paired up as Reading buddies. Hopefully the teacher who created this page had releases from the students’ parents but I wanted to share an educational example of but I wanted to show a glog used in the classroom.

Soure: Glogster Cybrarian

This Glogster is an example of a webquest that a teacher created for her students to use. The graphics are links to research sites and online activities the students need to complete. Students can create their webquests for other students or classes to complete to extend learning or enrich a classroom activity. Talk about creating excitement using such a creative, limitless tool! We strive for students to exert their independence and show their creativity and personal expression and Glogster allows students (and their teachers) to do just that by creating content area activities requiring the creative use of Glogster in an infinite number of ways for display. Take some time and explore and you will soon see the value and ideas rolling around in your head and students’ minds when you use Glogster!

Four **FREE** Must See Resources You Won’t Want to Miss

Hello, my name is Kim and I am addicted to microblogging. Whether it be Twitter or Plurk it doesn’t matter as long as I am reading, collaborating, sharing, conversing, etc. An awesome mentor, friend and colleague, Peggy George, introduced me to Tweetdeck to view and follow tweets on Twitter. As a result of those tweets or plurks, I discovered some fantastic resources that I have to share with you. You may be familiar with some of the ones I will share, especially if we follow one another on Plurk or Twitter. I am going to do a four part series on these new resources that you won’t want to miss so be sure to stay tuned for all four postings. These four resources are not the end all to be all sites but they are new to many in the microbloggingsphere and have really been Anyway, on with the show!

Source: Glogster

The first site is Glogster. At Glogster you can upload pictures, add graphics and text to the pictures and create graphics to dress up blogs, wikis, websites or your avatars for various sites. You can be as creative as your imagination is capable of and the possibilities of designing graphics at this site is endless. The site is user friendly and phenomenal for creating exciting collages for homepages of wikis, blogs, websites or class projects.

I was looking through the ones that were shared at the site and there are some amazing creations to explore for ideas and motivation. Be cautious though and steer younger students away from the gallery if using with students as some of the creations are of adult content; not necessarily obscene or vulgar just of adult topics like rape or diseases. I saw one class creation of butterflies and a student example using the graphics at the site for a diagram similar to those created in Inspiration but more colorful.

Pagesage

Source: Pagesage

This Glogster is of a two groups of students paired up as Reading buddies. Hopefully the teacher who created this page had releases from the students’ parents but I wanted to share an educational example of but I wanted to show a glog used in the classroom.

Soure: Glogster Cybrarian

This Glogster is an example of a webquest that a teacher created for her students to use. The graphics are links to research sites and online activities the students need to complete. Students can create their webquests for other students or classes to complete to extend learning or enrich a classroom activity. Talk about creating excitement using such a creative, limitless tool! We strive for students to exert their independence and show their creativity and personal expression and Glogster allows students (and their teachers) to do just that by creating content area activities requiring the creative use of Glogster in an infinite number of ways for display. Take some time and explore and you will soon see the value and ideas rolling around in your head and students’ minds when you use Glogster!

GustavTracker via Twitter

Requesting help for assistance or aid from Hurricane Gustav just went high tech. If you know of someone that may be in the path of Gustav, please text or forward this information to them.

According to the GustavTracker page, tweets may be sent to request assistance or rescue and report if someone has safely escaped the destructive forces of Gustav.

All messages received at the “gustavhelp” or “gustavsafeTwitter accounts will be re-posted for public viewing here. PLEASE follow this public page if you are in a position to help. An RSS feed is forthcoming as we bring the site online.

Those affected by Gustav must first add “gustavhelp” or “gustavsafe” to their Twitter profile. This can be done using the internet or a cell phone if power or outages are in effect. The GustavTracker page continues with,

Due to Twitter’s limitations, there is no way for the public to personally respond to these messages. If a message does not have contact info, please email marina@marinamartin (dot) com and she will send a direct message back to that person.

The above may need to be explained to someone as well as how to use Twitter if the person is not familiar with the social networking tool. With the evacuation efforts and the use of Twitter, hopefully many lives will be saved. Additionally, if you are trying to locate the whereabouts of someone affected by Gustav, make sure to search the Red Cross Safe & Well site.